We have here yesterday morning’s low tide in nearby Blue Hill. A soft rain is keeping the rock weed vibrant until its seawater blanket gets pulled up again. Tides here are usually between 10 and 12 feet in height.

  Image info:   Nikon D-180; Nikkor 70-200mm, f/2.8 zoom lens at 70mm; f/13; 1/160 sec.; ISO 400.

Image info: Nikon D-180; Nikkor 70-200mm, f/2.8 zoom lens at 70mm; f/13; 1/160 sec.; ISO 400.

Scientists don’t yet fully understand the seas’ gravitational resonances and the other factors affecting the twice-daily tidal phenomenon. However, Jonathan White’s fascinating book Tides helps laymen understand what scientists do know.

  Image info:   Nikon D-180; Nikkor 70-200mm, f/2.8 zoom lens at 70mm; f/18; 1/30 sec.; ISO 400.

Image info: Nikon D-180; Nikkor 70-200mm, f/2.8 zoom lens at 70mm; f/18; 1/30 sec.; ISO 400.

One thing is sure: we’ve come a long way since Leonardo da Vinci and others thought that the earth was a living entity that slowly breathed in and out through large lungs that moved the tides. (Brooklin, Maine)

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